Atom C, 2016

Full HD, 10:30 min, stereo sound

Atom C takes a poetical approach in describing the carbon cycle seen through the perspective of a single carbon atom. The animated video Atom C traces the journey of the atom from its birth in the Universe, through the biosphere and finally its end as part of the human consciousness. Seen through a first-person perspective, the viewer is being placed in the position of the carbon atom - the building block of terrestrial life. By assuming a first-person perspective, the aim of the piece is to imagine the visual sensation of traveling in a microscopic world as well as to challenge the viewer to imagine her or himself in a micro scale.

In the right part of the animation’s frame, an infographic supplies the viewer with information about the atom's states as it enters different environments, further adding metadata information to the visual aesthetic of the piece and assuming a more game-like visual experience. The piece is inspired by Primo Levi's book entitled 'The Periodic Table'. In the book’s chapter entitled 'Carbon', Levi is taking a carbon atom on a hypothetical journey through the biosphere upon which the animation’s narrative is based. Furthermore, scientific facts, data and chemical formulae related to the carbon cycle are used in construction of the animation.

Essentially, the piece aims to provoke reflections on the complex relationships of elements in building organic life. Furthermore, it aims to highlight the incredibly intricate yet fragile machinery of the biosphere, in the hope that it would spark thoughts on sustainability and preservation.

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Terra Elastica, 2017

110 x 150 x 160 cm, mixed media

Active Process

Terra Elastica is a kinetic sculpture that deals with the moon's gravitational pull that causes the oceans' tides.

Using mini solar panels, electro motors and paper origami made out of ocean maps, the piece aims to depict the intertwined relationship between the sun, moon and ocean i.e. the influence of cosmological systems on environmental systems and weather patterns.

The origami shapes are made from ocean maps, which derive from satellite images sourced from Google Earth. Furthermore, each shape represents one of the world’s oceans, with the Pacific Ocean being divided into South and North Pacific. Together, the six units form a star-shaped structure that is being put in motion through the spotlights’ sporadically cast light onto the solar panels.
The origami shapes are made from ocean maps, which derive from satellite images sourced from Google Earth. Furthermore, each shape represents one of the world’s oceans, with the Pacific Ocean being divided into South and North Pacific. Together, the six units form a star-shaped structure that is being put in motion through the spotlights’ sporadically cast light onto the solar panels.
As the shapes move, a movement sequence emerges and this movement pattern alludes to the orbit of the moon around the Earth, putting each origami in movement as it hovers over each ocean. This sequence is based on the moon’s gravitational pull of the ocean’s tides.
Essentially, the piece aims to trigger thoughts about the influence of the sun and moon over Earth’s eco systems as well as biological rhytms.

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Carbon, Sonic Cycles, 2016

The piece Carbon, Sonic Cycles is an interactive sound installation that deals with the carbon cycle. Drawings, archival documentary sound and scientific data that relate to different aspects of the carbon cycle are displayed on three cylinder-shaped rotating objects. The objects are colour coded into three main themes that tend to illustrate the element carbon from three different perspectives: green cylinder, looking at photosynthesis and carbon as the building block of terrestrial life; blue cylinder, looking at the Earth’s atmosphere and carbon’s role within it; and purple/grey cylinder: looking at carbon’s chemical and industrial characteristics.

Carbon Sonic Infographic

Infographic referencing the origins of data used for the work

By using the digital application Phono Paper created by Russian programmer Alexander Zolotov, through tablets and smart phone devices, the work invites participants to translate the data on the cylinders into sound, further revealing an ongoing musical composition of the carbon cycle. The objects are silently rotating in the space and sound can only be activated through participation. Each object contains three different soundscapes and by the participant’s choice on which one of the three will be activated, and through the number of possible combinations played at one time, a unique sound composition emerges every time the work is enabled.

Video documentation of the work:

This ongoing change in the musical outcome is used as a metaphor for the complex nature of the carbon cycle, the series of processes by which carbon compounds are interconverted in the environment, involving the incorporation of carbon dioxide into living tissue by photosynthesis and its return to the atmosphere through respiration, the decay of dead organisms, and the burning of fossil fuels.
Carbon, Sonic Cycles is part of a larger series entitled Carbon Memories, first shown at the NI MoCA Skopje in May 2016.

Active Process, 2016

Active Process is an interactive sonic installation that deals with the carbon cycle. Inspired by electronic music pioneer Daphne Oram’s Oramics machine that uses drawings to create sounds designed in 1957, as well as the ANS Synthesizer that uses similar techniques, designed by Russian engineer Yevgeny Murzin from 1937 to 1957, the piece is essentially a machine that turns drawings into sound.

Video documentation of the work:

By using a rotating motor with adjustable speed and the digital application Phono Paper created by Russian programmer Alexander Zolotov, the work invites participants to experiment with drawn sound waves. As the drawing surface rotates, the sound is looped in an endless cycle. This cyclical movement of the sound is used as a metaphor for the carbon cycle, the series of processes by which carbon compounds are interconverted in the environment, involving the incorporation of carbon dioxide into living tissue by photosynthesis and its return to the atmosphere through respiration, the decay of dead organisms, and the burning of fossil fuels.
The participants’ interaction with the piece illustrates our active participation in the carbon cycle process as the human factor.

Active Process is part of a larger series entitled Carbon Memories, first shown at the NI MoCA Skopje in May 2016. On the opening night of the show, the artist performed a sound performance entitled Active Process_01.

Video documentation of the performance:

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Photophilia, 2016

Photophilia is a proposition for a future human that evolved into a human-plant entity that is able to photosynthesise.
The work's title derives from the term 'photophilic', which is used when describing plant life that seeks and/or thrives in sunlight.
As bioethics and biopolitics become more and more integrated in art, there is an emergence of a new way of looking at evolution. Artist Eduardo Kac states that working with biomedia is an act of manipulating life, and for Kac, every manipulation is a part of evolution. Drawing from his idea of evolution, my proposal for the future human is a human that has evolved within the carbon cycle and has gained the ability to photosynthesize. By feeding on solar energy, this human-plant prototype has regained the egalitarian status within the biosphere and would enter the age of the Post-Anthropocene. Instead of cultivating nature for its own needs, this human is able to produce oxygen and become a sustainable link in the carbon cycle.

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Sonic Nature, 2015

Based on Pierre Schaeffer’s ‘Musique concrète’, Sonic Nature is an installation that uses both recorded sounds and sonifications that derive from a set of natural and manufactured objects. The piece utilizes projection mapping that corresponds to the individual sounds of the objects further visualising the sonic composition.

Projected scanners ‘read’ the shape of the objects, which is then transformed into sound. Other field recordings like knocking wood and crunching dead leaves are being digitally manipulated and accompanied by a projected manifestation of sound waves. By combining the physical and the digital, Sonic Nature aims to question the border between the real and virtual, as well as to propose a new visualization of sound.

Abandoning Symmetry, 2013

FullHD, 04:49, 2013
The piece explores the differences and similarities between the biological and industrial evolutions. Through an experimental approach, the footages act as single cells of complex organisms, trying to fit into the even bigger picture of an eco or industrial mechanism. With this work, I tried to question the paradox of our age where the industry tries to follow the systems and mechanisms of nature, yet fails to preserve its primary source of inspiration.

Abandoning Symmetry was shown as a part of the Victoria and Albert Digital Design Challenge during Design Week in 2013.

Switching Heads – Sound mapping the [Arctic], 2015

Switching Heads – Sound mapping the [Arctic] is the first in an on-going project by artist duo Holly Owen and Kristina Pulejkova. Environmentally un-intrusive sculpture, binaural sound technology and film come together to record the sights, sounds and stories of areas around the globe that are most at risk from the effects of our rapidly changing climate.
Owen and Pulejkova have created a life-size mould of a head that can be stuffed with organic material found in a specific environment. The use of local material means the sculpture can be left in place to melt, crumble or decompose without adding or taking anything away from the area. This organic head holds a pair of binaural microphones that records the environmental and human sounds of the landscape in 360 degrees.
Through this mixed-media work Switching Heads - sound mapping the Arctic transports the viewer through perspective sound, moving image and tactile organic sculpture to areas worst affected by changes in our global climate. Engaging the senses, the project will draw upon the lived experience, encouraging audiences to act through feelings of empathy.

The final moving image piece, Fram (norvegian for forward), was shown guerilla-style in Paris as part of the art and culture festival ArtCOP21 during the United Nations Climate Change conferences in winter 2015. Dressed as Arctic explorers, through a city expedition, they carried their finished Arctic film and two pairs of headphones on their backs as they walked through the city. In doing this, they brought the experience out to the public, inviting locals, tourists, climate concerned individuals as well as artists to switch places with the snow head to watch, listen and explore life in The Arctic Circle.

Watch and listen to the artists’ immersive moving image piece Fram. (The binaural sound is audible through headphones.)

Bioluminescence, 2015

Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism. The same entitled piece takes the idea of a luminescent organism and transfers it onto two cord-connected objects that use Electroluminescent (EL) wire to communicate with each other. The woven EL Wire light patches act as transmitters of signals and are lit in sequences, further signifying the receiving and sending of messages between the objects.

X (automated sequence), 2013 – on going

X (automated sequence)' is a series of drawings that deal with the loss of memory or memory erosion. Memory erosion occurs during execution of automated tasks which provide no or little experience. In retrospect, those actions are not registered in our memory. Instead, our memory is a collection of fragments of actions that hold a high density of experience. By writing the x, I tend to record the automated sequence further exposing the fragmentation of memory.

POINT OF VIEW (Organic Cartography), 2012

POINT OF VIEW is an installation consisting four pieces of paintings, video projections and sound. The works are cartographic representations of four types of migrating animals. This is achieved by taking the microscopic patterns of the animals as the landscape, and the animals’ migration patterns as the networks or routes of the map. As all living beings transform through time and space, the maps in question will tend to undergo this same process much like unfrozen worlds in constant flux.
As climate change and man made environment interventions continue to influence the migrating routes of these animals, this piece questions the (in)ability of these animals to adapt to the fast changing pace of their environments.

Capsule, 2015

Capsule sketch

Capsule is an installation piece that explores the concepts of real time and subjective time perception. Different time scales are overlapped in order to collapse any linearity in the narrative structure. Past, present and future become a chaotic flat plane where distant stories of space and time mix with personal time perception narratives of artists and scientists. This temporal polyphony is enhanced with soundscapes from the plasma oscillations from the JET fusion reactor and stellar sonifications from NASA’s Kepler Project.
Capsule consists of two pieces, which are connected via web cam live feed. The capsule – shaped viewing pod derives from a cross section of the torus-shaped JET fusion reactor. Inside the capsule, there is a looped projection of the same titled animation piece, which is occasionally interrupted by a live feed of the second piece titled My Time Is Your Time, which is an interactive light structure, further adding an aspect of ‘real time’.

My Time Is Your Time is an interactive LED light structure that explores the process of energy distribution. The Universe holds a finite amount of energy that cannot be gained nor destroyed, but only redistributed. Here, participants are invited to make their ‘light footprints’ that get fragmented and reshaped by the next person’s interaction, further emphasizing the passage of time and energy as the only thing that is truly timeless.
‘Capsule’ was awarded the Daniel Ford International Prize for Innovation , Central Saint Martins College in 2014 and the 11th Young Artist Biennial Prize in Skopje Macedonia in 2015 resulting with a solo show at the Museum for Contemporary Art in Skopje, Macedonia to be realised in 2016.

Epicentre, September 2015, Skopje, Macedonia

Epicentre is an audio-visual piece by the artist Kristina Pulejkova and the experimental music duo KNNT. Comissioned by the City Creative Network (CCN) the performance opened the new Nautilus Konstrukt public stage in Skopje, Macedonia. Epicentre uses sounds created from seismic data from the city Skopje as well as imagery from the city’s post 1963 brutalist architecture, proposing a new geo-urban sound specific to the city.

Seismic data sourced from The Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Seismology, IZIIS are made into sonified data loops, which are combined with live music by KNNT, further exploring the capital’s geological and urban sonic identity. The outdoor stage is taken as a focal point that enables cultural diversity in the city’s public domain.

Initially, the work takes the term epicentre from both a seismological and a metaphorical aspect, exploring the city as a geologically and socially shifting environment. In the latter respect, the stage is taken as a cultural epicentre that has the capacity to ‘shake the ground’ of the current complacent cultural realm and brake way for emerging artists working across the creative disciplines.
The data sets are sonified with an ANS Synthesizer emulator, based on the ANS Synthesizer that was used for the soundtrack of the film Solaris (1972) by the Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky, Epicentre draws a connection between Tarkovsky’s futuristic sets and the capital’s concrete futuristic architecture, further echoing the post 1963 idea of rendering Skopje as the city of the future.

Carbonated Memories, May 2016

Solo Show, Museum for Contemporary Art, Skopje, Macedonia

Carbonated Memories is the concept for the artist’s upcoming solo show awarded by the Museum for Contemporary Arts in Skopje, Macedonia. Funded by the Macedonian Ministry of Culture, the show will be exhibited at the Museum for the Contemporary Arts in Skopje in 2016.

The exhibition will be looking at the chemical and philosophical aspects of carbon, the element whose chemical basis is responsible for all known life. Seen through the journeys of a carbon atom, the exhibition will contain a series of works that depict the atom’s cyclical journey through the biosphere. As the carbon travels through the various eco systems, it gets repeatedly recycled and thus forming an endless loop. The question that the show poses is whether the carbon atom retains the memory of all its former beings and if so, do we as humans retain the molecular memories of all the carbon’s previous states.
All the known elements are a result of stellar supernovas. After a supernova occurs, due to the powerful blast the newly formed elements are scattered in the universe in a form of stardust. The clustering of stardust creates planets such as ours, as well as all the life on it. Having in mind that we are all made of ancient building blocks, as we breathe, can we try and remember our molecular past?
Through the use of moving image, interactive installations and sound objects, the artist will create works that look at the carbon cycle and echo its previous journeys.

Just one drop, 2015-2016

Storyboard mockups

Just one drop is a music video to be created for Scaramount – a project initiated by poet and radio presenter Mr Gee and producer Lawrence Mohammed . Initially written by Mr Gee for one of his news inspired radio shows, Just one drop is a poem about climate change where a man apologises to mother Nature for his abuse.

Switching Heads – Sound mapping the Arctic,

Switching heads Switching heads

Images: Slate head model, © Holly Owen

Following Holly Owen’s successful art residency at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) in Wales, Owen and Pulejkova will create their next Switching Heads project with the centre’s sustainability-engaged community.

Modified, 2017

100 x 40 x 150 cm, mixed media and AR application

In Modified, social and psychological aspects of becoming a cyborg are explored through the use of augmented reality (AR). The piece consists of three different scenarios or modules that are meant to play out onto a participant’s skin. Through the use of AR, Modified explores the role of the implant in cyborg aesthetics as well as the idea of perceiving the human as a host to the technology. Three different simulations of an implant penetrating into the participant’s skin are constructed, each imagining a different aspect of a possible human enhancement. Based on survey research as well as futurist theory, the idea of the piece is to provide different alternatives to what being a cyborg could mean.

This piece was produced as part of the LCN artist development programme. Through mentoring and technical support, the programme supported my research and experimentation with augmented reality, further enabling me to incorporate this knowledge into my practice. Sound design produced by Ed Berriman.

My Heart Has Run Out Of Breath

My Heart Has Run Out Of Breath is a collaborative audio-visual project by visual artist Kristina Pulejkova and musician and Piano Magic member Glen Johnson.
Pulejkova’s film, in which familiar images from the movies of Stanley Kubrick and Andrei Tarkovsky, amongst others, are transformed into new, otherworldly entities, is not only mixed live by Pulejkova but soundtracked live by Johnson.
Informed by 70’s science fiction films, the animation’s aesthetic aims to isolate the iconic images from their environment, further placing them into different contexts and relations to other characters. The final result is a world of characters and creatures, suggestive of being inside a man/machine hybrid or floating in the vast emptiness of space.

The set is divided into different tracks entitled ‘hearts’ which are then paired with accompanying visuals. As both music and visuals are mixed live, ‘My Heart Has Run Out Of Breath is a piece that is ever changing, giving the audience a glance of its perpetual flux.
Following Johnson and Pulejkova’s two-year long collaboration, the piece resulted in a music album accompanied by video, released through the Second Language record label in January 2016.
As part of the project, a series of water colours were developed based on the animated piece, which then provided the basis for the CD artwork.

My Heart Has Run Out Of Breath has been performed at Cafe Oto , one of the London leading experimental music venues, as a part of a group show at the Brunel Museum Tunnel Shaft in London for the Art Licks Weekend Festival and in the Electric Palace Cinema in Hastings, UK.

Switching Heads – Sound mapping the Arctic

Switching Heads – Sound mapping the Arctic is the first in an on going project by artist duo Holly Owen (http://www.hollyowenartist.com) and Kristina Pulejkova. Environmentally un-intrusive sculpture, binaural sound technology and film come together to record the sights, sounds and stories of areas around the globe that are most at risk from the effects of our rapidly changing climate.
Owen and Pulejkova have created a life-size mould of a head that can be stuffed with organic material found in a specific environment. The use of local material means the sculpture can be left in place to melt, crumble or decompose without adding or taking anything away from the area. This organic head holds a pair of binaural microphones that records the environmental and human sounds of the landscape in 360 degrees. Video captures the events in real time.
Through this mixed-media work Switching Heads - sound mapping the Arctic transports the viewer through perspective sound, real-time moving image and tactile organic sculpture to areas worst affected by changes in our global climate. Engaging the senses, the project will draw upon the lived experience, encouraging audiences to act through feelings of empathy.

In spring 2015 Owen and Pulejkova embarked on an art expedition to the island city of Tromsø situated between fjords at the upper most tip of Norway, deep within The Arctic Circle.
They invited local people to share their stories, traditions and experiences of living in the Arctic Circle with a head cast in snow, whilst binaural microphones and film recorded the events. The final film work will be shown guerilla-style in Paris as part of the art and culture festival artCOP21 during the United Nations climate conferences in winter 2015. Through a city expedition they will carry their finished Arctic film and an individual pair of headphones on their backs as they walk through the city. In doing this they will bring the experience out to the public, inviting locals, tourists, climate concerned individuals as well as artists to switch places with the snow head to watch, listen and explore life in The Arctic Circle.

Kristina Pulejkova is a London-based artist whose works engage with science. Working across disciplines, Pulejkova is looking for connections between man and machine, the organic and mechanical.

Born 1988 in Skopje, Macedonia

Kristina Pulejkova (1988, Skopje, Macedonia) is a London-based multimedia artist who works at the intersection of art, science and technology. Working mainly with moving image and installation, she aims to build a subjective narrative based on data and principles from the scientific disciplines of astronomy, physics, biology and ecology. Her main subjects of interest are time, ecosystems and mechanisms, looking for connections between man and machine, the organic and the mechanical.

Pulejkova’s recent research focuses around ideas of the posthuman and cyborg aesthetic. Drawing on transgenics, biotechnology and bionics, as well as the growing human reliance on technology, she explores narratives around technologically enhanced humans. By looking at human-computer interfaces, the research aims to redefine the body and the self into an extended self through technology, and explore how this prosthetic relationship might evolve into a symbiotic one in the near future.

Since 2013, she also works as part of the artist duo Owen – Pulejkova. The duo aims to create series of artworks entitled Switching Heads-sound mapping the [...] , which focus on the way climate change is affecting communities and environments around the globe.

Education:

2012 - 2014, MA studies in Art and Science, Central Saint Martins College for Art and Design, London, UK

2006 - 2012, Magisterium degree (BA + MA) in Painting and Animated Film, University of Applied Arts, Vienna, Austria

Awards and Nominations:

  • 2017 Participant in the SPACE London Creative Network Programme
  • 2015 Young Artist Award, 11th Biennial of Young Artists in Skopje, Macedonia
  • 2014 Daniel Ford International Prize for Innovation
  • 2009 film.riss Audience Award for experimental film
  • Shortlisted for the 2016 Tate Exchange Residency with Beaconsfield Gallery Vauxhal, Gasworks Gallery, Pump House Gallery and Nine Elms
  • Honorary Mention for the 2016 ESA and Ars Electronica Residency
  • Nominated for the 2014 Red Mansion Prize

Selected Exhibitions and Screenings:

Solo Exhibitions:

  • 2016, Carbon Memories, Museum of Contemporary Art Skopje, MK
  • 2014, Capsule, Brunel Museum - Thames Tunnel Shaft, London, UK

Group Exhibitions and Screenings:

  • 2017
  • (Upcoming) Ästhetik Der Veränderung, MAK, Vienna, AT
    LCN Showcase, SPACE, London, UK
    (Upcoming) Switching Heads – Sound mapping the quarry, Centre for Alternative Technology, Powys, Wales,UK
    (EVA) Electronic Visualisations in the Arts Conference, British Computational Society, London, UK
    Lumen: School of Light, Ugly Duck, London, UK

  • 2016
  • Invisible City Symphonies, St John on Bethnal Green, London, UK
    Urban Bliss, Graphic, London, UK
    Bring Your Own Beamer, Lumen Studios, London, UK

  • 2015
  • Hello Ape Eyes, Art Licks Weekend Festival, Thames Tunnel Shaft, London, UK
    My Heart Has Run Out Of Breath, Café Oto, London, UK
    My Heart Has Run Out Of Breath, Electric Palace Cinema, Hastings, UK
    Heteroglossia, Central Saint Martins, London, UK
    Two Sisters, Tricky Women film festival, Vienna, AT

  • 2014
  • XI Young Artists Biennial, Multimedia Center Mala Stanica, Skopje, MK
    Bizarre Sound Creatures, Het Glaspaviljoen, Eindhoven, NL
    Switching Heads, ArtCOP21 Festival, Paris, FR
    Switching Heads, Time To Act Week, The Synergy Centre, Brighton, UK
    Switching Heads, Interrobang, Omnibus Theatre, London, UK
    Fram, Switching Heads, The Centre for Alternative Technology, Powys, Wales, UK

  • 2013
  • Digital Design Challenge, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK
    In Transit, V22, London, UK
    The Convergence of the Twain, Science Museum, London, UK
    X Biennial of Young Artists, Museum of Contemporary Art, Skopje, MK

  • 2012
  • On Being Different at the Same Time, UAL Showcase Gallery, London, UK
    Essence, Kuenstlerhaus, Vienna, AT
    Umwaelt Umwaelzen, Amthof, Feldkirchen, AT

  • 2010
  • To approach, University for Applied Arts, Vienna, AT
    Essence, Kuenstlerhaus, Vienna, AT
    Until I find you, Tricky Women film festival, Vienna, AT
    Fear, Showroom Gallery Ulrike Hrobsky, Vienna, AT

  • 2009
  • Three stories at once, Project space Kunsthalle, Vienna, AT
    Naehe, Xpedit Kiosk, Vienna, AT
    Until I find you, film:riss film festival, Salzburg, AT
    Until I find you, Up-and-coming film festival, Hanover, DE

email: contact@kristinapulejkova.com

Twitter: @TinaPulejkova